Case Studies

Testbeds Community Profile: Second Life for Used Batteries

Bii recently installed a solar + storage system using repurposed hybrid bus batteries. The system provides broadband internet access to 700 customers in a remote area of British Columbia. Pictured l-r: Al Mundy and Matthew Murbach of Battery Informatics, Inc.

Bii recently installed a solar + storage system using repurposed hybrid bus batteries. The system provides broadband internet access to 700 customers in a remote area of British Columbia. Pictured l-r: Al Mundy and Matthew Murbach of Battery Informatics, Inc.[/caption]

Energy storage is a critical component to advancing clean energy technologies. But what happens to a battery after reaching the end of its useful life? Battery Informatics, Inc. (Bii) is finding new uses for batteries that have outlived their initial purpose but still have something left to give.

The Bii team recently installed a 7.2 kWh system that combines solar panels with decommissioned hybrid bus batteries to power internet service among a remote island community in Desolation Sound, British Columbia. System installations like this are the next evolution for the company, which has developed a sophisticated battery management and testing system in order to diagnose and identify the useful life of lithium-ion storage systems. Their technology helps promote waste reduction, renewable energy, and applications for clean energy in rural developments and low and middle income communities.

Bii, a University of Washington spin-out, rents office space at the Washington Clean Energy Testbeds and is one of the first companies to take up residency in the facility. Matthew Murbach, Bii chief technology officer, cites the Seattle location, pay-as-you-go pricing and associated cost savings, and a supportive clean tech start-up community as the greatest benefits of their Testbeds workspace.

Media:

Rethinking Electric Power, Prompted by Politics and Disaster, New York Times